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Exploring resistance movements and alternative forms of living from a gendered perspective.

  • Judy Chicago, Smoke Bodies, 1972. Courtesy the artist, Salon 94, New York and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

  • Eduardo Gil, Ninos Desaparecidos, Segunda Marcha de la resistencia, Buenos Aires, 1982. Courtesy the artist

Still I Rise is a timely exhibition exploring the history of resistance and alternative forms of living from the perspective of gender. This major group exhibition looks at the many forms resistance can take: from intimate acts to large-scale uprisings, from the late 19th century to the present and beyond.

Still I Rise presents the way in which resistance has been approached by visual artists, writers, architects, designers, activists, working as individuals or in groups. Grounded in intersectional and queer feminist perspectives, it takes place within a global context, referring to recent women-led uprisings and demonstrations, as well as historic moments including the Civil Rights Movement, independence movements against colonial rule in Africa, the Women’s Liberation Movement, the AIDS crisis and the Stonewall Rebellion.

At the core of Still I Rise is the idea of collaboration, community building and egalitarianism. The gallery space will host discussions, workshops and performances, creating a site for participation and a platform for multiple voices. Within the exhibition, visitors are invited to build their own version of the accompanying publication, reflecting a history of self-publishing as a form of resistance.

Exhibiting artists and collectives include: Fanny Adams, Jane Addams/Hull-House, Amina Ahmed, Alice Constance Austin, Xenobia Bailey, Glenn Belverio (Glennda Orgasm), Carolina Caycedo, Judy Chicago, Phyllis Christopher, Jackie Collins and Pat Garrett, Blondell Cummings, Dyke Action Machine!, Feminist Land Art Retreat, Guo Fengyi, , Carl Gent, Eduardo Gil, Gran Fury, Jesse Jones, Corita Kent, Suzanne Lacy, Ellen Lesperance, Zoe Leonard, Mary Lowndes, Matrix Feminist Design Co-operative, Louise Michel, Ad Minoliti, Ni Una Menos, Okwui Okpokwasili, 0rphan Drift, Lala Rukh, Zorka Ságlová, See Red Women’s Workshop, Tai Shani, Terence Smith (Joan Jett Blakk), Linda Stupart, Ramaya Tegegne, Jala Wahid, Faith Wilding, Osías Yanov.

The exhibition is a collaboration between Nottingham Contemporary and the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea. It has been curated by Irene Aristizábal (Nottingham Contemporary), Rosie Cooper (De La Warr Pavilion) and Cédric Fauq (Nottingham Contemporary).

Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Act 1 is currently on view at Nottingham Contemporary until 20 January 2019. Read Hannah Clugston’s 5-star review in The Guardian here.

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Staying locally

There are plenty of welcoming and good value B&Bs & boutique hotels in Bexhill. The De La Warr Pavilion regularly uses the following :

Travel information
  • By Rail
    Direct trains go from London Victoria, Brighton and Ashford to Bexhill.
    There are also trains from London Charing Cross, changing at St. Leonards Warrior Square and from London Bridge or Charing Cross going to Battle. Battle is only a short taxi journey away (15 mins approx).
    Visit www.nationalrail.co.uk for up-to-date train travel information.
  • Taxis
    Town Taxis:  01424 211 511
    Parkhurst Taxis:  01424 733 456
  • By Car
    If driving from the London area:
    Take the M25, then A21 to Hastings. Turn off at John‘s Cross and follow the signs to Bexhill.
    OR
    Take the A22 to Eastbourne, go across the Bishop roundabout to the A271 and follow the signs to Bexhill and the seafront. The De La Warr Pavilion is on the Marina.
    From the Brighton area:
    Follow the A27 out of Brighton until you arrive in Bexhill On Sea.
  • Parking
    Please be aware the Rother District car park outside the De La Warr Pavilion operates paid parking until 8pm. After this time parking is free. There is also lmiited free car parking along the seafront.
Accessibility

Within the limits of this Grade One listed building, the De La Warr Pavilion strives to be fully accessible with a range of facilities to support your visit.

Assistance Dogs are permitted into the building.

Please contact the Box Office on 01424 229 111 to arrange a visit.

Facilities for disabled visitors

  • Ramped access at the front of the building
  • A low counter at the Box Office and  Information Desk
  • Disabled toilets on two floors
  • A lift to all floors
  • Accessible galleries on both floors
  • An accessible Café
  • Spaces for wheelchairs in the auditorium for seated events
  • Ramped access in the auditorium for events during the day
  • Ramped access into the Studio
  • Two travel wheelchairs are available for use at the De La Warr Pavilion. To reserve, please call our box office and information desk on (01424) 229111 or ask a member of staff on arrival. The chairs are provided on a first come, first served basis and are intended for use inside the Pavilion. Please contact us for more information.

Facilities for blind or visually-impaired

  • Large print season brochures

Facilities for the hard-of-hearing

  • An T-Switch induction loop in some areas of the auditorium (please indicate when booking as this facility is not available on the balcony)
  • British Sign Language interpretation tours of the building and exhibitions are available on request.